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2 to 3 year olds: 1 cup
4 to 8 year olds: 1 ½ cups
9 to 13 year old girls: 2 cups 9 to 13 year old boys 2 ½ cups
14 to 18 year old girls: 2 ½ cups 14 to 18 year old boys: 3 cups

Eat your veggies

FRUITS
Fruits are especially good sources of important vitamins
like A and C. They also add minerals such as potassium
and fiber, which assist with digestion. It’s best to eat raw
fruits, but be sure to scrub them before serving. For kids
who get about 30 minutes of exercise each day, the USDA
recommends:
 2 to 3 year olds: 1 cup
 4 to 8 year olds: 1 ½ cups
 9 to 13 year old girls/boys 1 ½ cups
 14 to 18 year old girls: 1 ½ cups
 14 to 18 year old boys: 2 cups

DAIRY
The dairy group, which includes milk, yogurt and cheese, is
an important source of vitamin A and D, calcium and protein.
Vitamin A helps build healthy eyes, skin and hair.
Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and use it for
healthy bones and teeth, along with muscle and nerve functions.
For kids who get about 30 minutes of exercise each
day, the USDA recommends:
2 to 3 year olds: 2 cups
4 to 8 year olds: 2 cups
9 to 13 year old girls/boys 3 cups
14 to 18 year old girls/boys 3 cups

MEAT, FISH, BEANS AND NUTS
This food group provides protein, which helps your child’s
body maintain and repair body tissues and build muscles.
Foods in this group also provide vitamin B-complex and
iron, which help build strong bones and teeth and support
muscles. For kids who get 30 minutes of exercise each day,
the USDA recommends:
2 to 3 year olds: 2 ounces
4 to 8 years olds: 3 to 4 ounces
9 to 13 year old girls/boys 5 ounces
14 to 18 year old girls: 5 ounces
14 to 18 year old boys: 6 ounces
Besides an ounce of meat, poultry, or fish kids also get about
1 ounce of protein from: ¼ cup cooked dry beans, 1 egg 1
tablespoon of peanut butter, ½ ounce of nuts or seeds


FATS, OILS AND SWEETS
Fats and oils are essential to maintain body function but should be used
sparingly. Fats help the body absorb vitamins A, D, E, K and betacarotene,
but should be limited because of their high calorie content.
Oils are fats that are liquid at room temperature, like vegetable oils.
Oils can come from plants and fish. Some foods are naturally high in
oils, like nuts, olives, avocados. Most oils are high in monounsaturated
or polyunsaturated fats. These fats raise levels of (good) HDL
cholesterol while not raising levels of (bad) LDL cholesterol (the kind
that can lead to heart problems. Fats should not be restricted in kids
under age 2. Their developing brains and other organs need a certain
amount of fat for proper development. Sugars are quickly absorbed
into the bloodstream to provide a quick dose of energy. But limit the
amount of sugar you feed your kids from candy, sweets and other
foods because the body stores the extra sugar it doesn’t immediately
need as fat. That can lead to weight gain and other health problems.

www.busycooks.about.com or www.healthyafterschoolsnacks

 

 
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